Collective Nouns

Collective Nouns

 

Can you remember learning about a collective noun in your ninth grade English class? Boy, I surly do. Mr. Ellis made certain we could properly diagram, yes, diagram, a sentence containing a collective noun. Well, just in case you have forgotten all you learned about this important part of the English language, this blog will refresh your memory.

A collective noun is a word used to represent a group of people, animals, or things. Examples of collective nouns are herd of cattle, colony of ants, school of fish, or flock of birds to name just a few. I have chosen to illustrate the collective noun flock with sixteen of my bird photographs.

A flock is defined as a number of birds of one kind feeding, resting, and traveling together. Rather than referring to a flock of birds, folks in the bird world have created other names for different birds as you will read in the caption under each photograph.

Click on each photograph to enlarge

A Grain of Sanderling
A Grain of Sanderling
A Posse of Wild Turkey
A Posse of Wild Turkey
A Conspiracy of Black Skimmer
A Conspiracy of Black Skimmer
A Squadron of White Pelican and A Flotilla of Gull
A Squadron of White Pelican and A Flotilla of Gull
A Fling of Willet
A Fling of Willet
A Cloud of Red - winged Blackbird
A Cloud of Red – winged Blackbird
A Cast of Green Jay
A Cast of Green Jay
A Congregation of Great Egret
A Congregation of Great Egret
A Swoop of whooping Crane
A Swoop of Whooping Crane
a Whirligg of Wilsons Phalarope
a Whirligg of Wilsons Phalarope
A Lute of Mallard
A Lute of Mallard
A Merl of Yellow - headed Blackbird
A Merl of Yellow – headed Blackbird
A Bowl of Roseate Spoonbill
A Bowl of Roseate Spoonbill
A Gulp of Neotropical Cormorant
A Gulp of Neotropical Cormorant
A Battery of Great Blue Heron
A Battery of Great Blue Heron
A Ballet of Trumpter Swan
A Ballet of Trumpeter Swan

 

 

 

 

 

Snack Time

Snack Time

This Blogger/Photographer was fortunate enough to be standing in the right place at the right time, with Nikon slung around his neck, to capture this beautiful adult Tricolored Heron searching, stalking, catching and savoring a mid- morning snack.

Click on each photo to enlarge

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A Senior Citizen Science Project

A Senior Citizen Science Project

This Blogger and his Chief Editor, while attending the 2016 Whooping Crane Festival, had the opportunity to hear an expert speak about the life, biology, of monarch butterflies. The information presented was so informative and entertaining that we were motivated to become involved in the life cycle of the beautiful monarch butterfly. A Senior Citizen Science Project sprang forth on March 11 with the purchase of a $20 potted milkweed plant.

The monarch butterfly is found throughout the United States as well as Mexico and Canada. Astonishingly, these small insects can make a 3,000-mile journey in the fall of the year to their wintering location in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of Mexico or to southern California, depending on which part of the United States or Canada they migrate. The monarchs in this blog are migrating North from Mexico because they are on the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains. Monarchs can fly 50 to 100 miles per day; it can take up to two months to make the trip to their winter home. Monarchs produce four generations during one summer. The first three generations have a life span of 2-6 weeks and will continue moving north. During this time, they will mate and have the next generation that will continue the northward migration. The fourth generation is different. They can live up to nine months before the long journey to their winter home in California or Mexico.

The photographs in this blog are intended to inform and show the four stages in the fascinating life of a monarch butterfly. The four stages are:

  • The eggs stage which lasts about four days.
  • The caterpillar(larva) stage lasts about two weeks.
  • The chrysalis(pupa) stage lasts about ten days.
  • The adult stage of the Monarch butterfly lasts from 2-6 weeks and then the next generation process begins repeating the same process except for the fourth generation.

On April 17 our project ended when the last of our monarchs suddenly took flight from my finger in a northerly direction which caused happiness along with some sadness. Happy because our project produced 6 first generation female monarch butterflies; sad because they will never return – empty nest.

You should know that the monarch butterfly population has been on the decline due to habitat loss. One way to help is to plant milkweed to provide a place for the monarch butterfly to lay her eggs and provide food for the caterpillar. Spring forth with a Senior Citizen Science Project next spring

MILKWEED PLANT - MARCH 11 BEGINS THE PROJECT
MILKWEED PLANT – MARCH 11 BEGINS THE PROJECT
MONARCH LAYING EGGS - STAGE ONE
MONARCH LAYING EGGS – STAGE ONE
LARVA-CATERPILLAR - STAGE 2
LARVA-CATERPILLAR – STAGE 2
3 LARVA- CATERPILLARS - STAGE 2
3 LARVA- CATERPILLARS – STAGE 2
LARVA -CATERPILLAR - STAGE 2
LARVA -CATERPILLAR – STAGE 2
5 LARVA - CATERPILLARS - STAGE 2
5 LARVA – CATERPILLARS – STAGE 2
2 LARVA - CATERPILLARS - STAGE 2
2 LARVA – CATERPILLARS – STAGE 2
5 LARVA - CATERPILLARS - STAGE 2
5 LARVA – CATERPILLARS – STAGE 2
CATERPILLAR BEGINNING PUPATION - STAGE 2
CATERPILLAR BEGINNING PUPATION – STAGE 2
CHRYSALIS - STAGE 3
CHRYSALIS – STAGE 3
FIRST GENERATION FEMALE MONARCHS - STAGE 4
FIRST GENERATION FEMALE MONARCHS – STAGE 4
11 Chrysalis - STAGE 3
CHRYSALIS – STAGE 3
FIRST GENERATION FEMALE MONARCH - STAGE 4
FIRST GENERATION FEMALE MONARCH – STAGE 4
APRIL 17 THE LAST ADULT
APRIL 17 THE LAST ADULT
APRIL 17, SHE LEFT FROM MY FINGER HEADED NORTH
APRIL 17, SHE LEFT FROM MY FINGER HEADED NORTH