Etcetera, Etcetera

Etcetera, Etcetera

Etcetera, Etcetera is the second blog in a series of three showing a diverse collection of my photographs.

Alaska
Alaska
Pistachio Trees, Alamogordo, NM
Pistachio Trees, Alamogordo, NM
Caught With Hand In The Candy Jar
Caught With Hand In The Candy Jar
Hibiscus
Hibiscus
Javalina, South Texas
Javalina, South Texas
Korean Memorial - Washington, DC
Korean Memorial – Washington, DC
Landscape Arch - Arches NP, UT
Landscape Arch – Arches NP, UT
Looking Through A Waterfall - Dallas, TX
Looking Through A Waterfall – Dallas, TX
Philadelphia, PA
Philadelphia, PA
My Madison River therapy Center - ID
My Madison River Therapy Center – ID
Pronghorns, Yellowstone NP, WY
Pronghorns, Yellowstone NP, WY
Raindrops On The Web - Spider
Raindrops On The Web – Spider
Jasminia Off Shore Accommodation Rig Being Towed To A Location In The Gulf of Mexico.
Jasminia Off Shore Accommodation Rig Being Towed To A Location In The Gulf of Mexico.
The Original Smokey Bear Grave Site, Capitan, NM
The Original Smokey Bear Grave Site, Capitan, NM
Summer Tanager
Summer Tanager
Texas
Texas

 

2016 Spring Migration Part 2

These twelve photographs are a continuation of last week’s migration photographs.

Click each photograph to enlarge

Yellow-Throated Warbler
Yellow-Throat Warbler
Yellow-headed Blackbird
Yellow-headed Blackbird
White-eyed Vireo
White-eyed Vireo
Swainson's Thrush
Swainson’s Thrush
Solitaire Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
Northern Parula Warbler
Northern Parula Warbler
Immature Indigo Bunting
Immature Indigo Bunting
Female Orchard Oriole
Female Orchard Oriole
Eastern Phoebe
Eastern Phoebe
Blue-winged warbler
Blue-winged warbler
Black-chinned Hummingbird
Black-chinned Hummingbird
American Redstart
American Redstart

 

2016 Spring Migration Part 1

2016 Spring Migration Part 1

The 2016 spring migration has begun along the Texas coast. Each time I go out to photograph these migrants, I see something new. This is the reason I will be publishing a 2016 Spring Migration Part 2.

All of the bird photographs in Part 1 and Part 2 were taken in Port Aransas, TX at the two most popular birding sites, Joan & Scott Holt Paradise Pond and Leonabelle Turnbull Birding Center.

Click on each photograph to enlarge

 

Indigo Bunting
Indigo Bunting
Immature Indigo Bunting
Immature Indigo Bunting
Wilson's Warbler
Wilson’s Warbler
Summer Tanager
Summer Tanager
Worm-eating Warbler
Worm-eating Warbler
Orchard Oriole
Orchard Oriole
Immature Male Orchard Oriole
Immature Male Orchard Oriole
Louisiana Watethrush
Louisiana Watethrush
Common Yellowthroat Warbler
Common Yellowthroat Warbler
Hooded Warbler
Hooded Warbler
Lesser Yellowlegs Sandpiper
Lesser Yellowlegs Sandpiper
Painted Bunting
Painted Bunting

 

 

 

 

 

The Saguaro

The Saguaro

(Sah – Wah – Ro)

As a child I enjoyed going to the movies to watch Roy and Gabby or Gene and Smiley, after turning the outlaws over to the sheriff, riding off into the desert, dotted with all those tall cacti with arms named Saguaros.  Many of these old westerns movies and TV series were filmed in Monument Valley Utah. Not intending to deflate anyone’s childhood memories of these now classic Hollywood productions and at the risk of being called a “Meanie”, the only location where the Saguaro cacti actually grow are in the Sonoran Desert in Mexico and Arizona at elevations generally lower than four thousand feet. I guess it’s the magic of cinematography that placed them in Monument Valley or other locations.

Saguaros are very slow growing, between 1 and 1.5 inches during the first eight years of life. As the Saguaro begins to age the growth rates will vary depending upon climate, precipitation and location. In the Saguaro National Park, near Tucson, AZ The branches or arms begin to appear when the Saguaro reaches 50 to 70 years of age. In lower elevations it may take as long as 100 years before the arms appear. The arms generally bend upward and can number over 25. The Saguaro is the largest cactus in the world.

When a Saguaro reaches 35 years of age, it begins to sprout a cluster of creamy flowers which open at night and close the next evening. It is during this time that pollination by bats, birds and insects occur. Late April through early June is when the tops of the Saguaro’s maim trunk and arms produce the flowers.

Saguaros roots grow out from the plant in a radial fashion several inches underground to capture water during the rainy season and store it in the ribs of the plant which expand as more water is captured.

An adult Saguaro is considered to be about 125 years of age. Because of the water it stores a Saguaro may weigh as much as 6 tons. The Saguaro is believed to have a life span of 150 to 175 years.

The Saguaro cacti provide building material for humans, nesting habitat for birds and fruit for both humans and wildlife.

I was fortunate to be able to photograph the Saguaros in the Saguaro National Park, The Arizona Desert Museum and Sabino Canyon State Park during the time period when they were in bloom.

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