Ruddy “T”

Ruddy “T”

While driving along the pristine Padre Island National Seashore, I spotted this cute little Ruddy Turnstone foraging at the edge of the gentle waves washing up on the shore. I drove my big Ford F350 truck to within approximately 50 feet of the bird and waterline, slipped quietly out with camera in hand and began clicking away. I was so excited to be this close to the Turnstone that I didn’t realize the Gulf of Mexico was slowly creeping closer, incoming tide. After capturing several images, I returned to the truck and attempted to leave. Yep, I was stuck in the sand and the tide was slowly reducing that 50 feet to a lesser distance. Since I was several miles from the National Seashore Headquarters; I had no cell phone service and to boot there was not a lot of people nearby. My level of anxiety and concern began to elevate just a little. Luckily, some kind person with a tow rope stopped and prevented this Blogger from being swept out to sea, well, maybe not to that extreme. In reflecting upon this experience, I felt a closer attachment to the Ruddy Turnstone so I gave him a more personalized name, Ruddy “T”.

Ruddy “T” is an interesting bird that travels great distances. In North America it spends the nesting season in Northern Alaska and the artic islands of Canada and then migrates to the coastlines of Washington, Massachusetts, the Gulf Coast and further South to the West Indies and the Southern tip of South America. Ruddy “T” is found along rocky and sandy shorelines, mud flats, but rarely inland. It uses its pointed bill to turn over stones and small rocks in search of food, thus the name Turnstone.

042 Ruddy Turnstone (6)

 

042 Ruddy Turnstone (5)

042 Ruddy Turnstone (4)

042 Ruddy Turnstone (2)

042 Ruddy Turnstone (1)

Twelve Days in “Cajun Country”

WELCOME TO "CAJUN COUNTRY"
WELCOME TO “CAJUN COUNTRY”

 

Twelve Days in Cajun Country

Just what is “Cajun Country”? Well, it’s that large cultural area in the State of Louisiana known as Acadiana, a name derived from French- Canadian “Acadians or in French “Acadiens”.  These Acadiens were exiled from their homeland of Acadia in Nova Scotia in the 1700’s and relocated to this region of Louisiana. Early Indians, Spanish immigrants, African slaves, Caribbean Creoles, some Germans and a handful of others also settled throughout the area. It’s the mixture of these peoples that created the rich and unique culture of south Louisiana.

Twelve days were spent traveling around and learning about Acadiana and also touring another area of south Louisiana known as the River Road famous for many old and interesting plantations. The photographs are intended to show the charm, history, and natural beauty of “Cajun Country”.

this is a segment of the 133 hundred mile Teche Bayou. Teche is an Indian term meaning snake which implies the curvy route of the Teche.
This is a segment of the 133 hundred mile Bayou Teche . Teche is an Indian term meaning snake which implies the curvy route of the Teche.
Shadows on the Teche
Shadows – on- the-Teche built in 1834 on the banks of Bayou Teche presents a vivid picture of the lives of people who lived, worked, and visited here from its plantation beginnings through the earliest days of the Civil Rights movement.
Conrad Rice Mill, America's oldest rice mill where Konriko Rice is milled in New Iberia, LA
Conrad Rice Mill, America’s oldest rice mill where Konriko Rice is milled in New Iberia, LA
The award winning author James Lee Burke frequented Victor's when he was a resident of New Iberia. Excellent home cooked food.
The award winning author James Lee Burke frequented Victor’s when he was a resident of New Iberia. Excellent home cooked food.
Sugar Cane Harvest
Sugar Cane Harvest
Sugar cane mill near Jeanerette, LA
Sugar cane mill near Jeanerette, LA
Joseph Jefferson Home (Rip Van Winkle) home - Jefferson Island, LA
Joseph Jefferson Home and Rip Van Winkle Gardens. Jefferson played the character Rip Van Winkle on the stage for many years – Jefferson Island, LA
Tabasco Plant
Tabasco Plant, Avery Island, LA
Evangeline Oak - Longfellow's poem "Evangeline immortalized the tragedy of the Acadian exile from Nova Scotia in 1755. This oak marks the legendary meeting place of Emmeline Labiche and Louis Arceneaux, the counterparts of Evangeline and Gabriel.
Evangeline Oak – Longfellow’s poem “Evangeline immortalized the tragedy of the Acadian exile from Nova Scotia in 1755. This oak marks the legendary meeting place of Emmeline Labiche and Louis Arceneaux, the counterparts of Evangeline and Gabriel. St. Martinville, LA
Oak Alley Plantation - Vacherie, LA
Oak Alley Plantation – Vacherie, LA
Slave Quarters at Oak Alley Plantation
Slave Quarters at Oak Alley Plantation
Houmas House Plantation -Darrow, LA
Houmas House Plantation -Darrow, LA
Vermilion Cultural Center replica of an early day school room. If heard speaking French, students were required to the sentence shown on the blackboard.
Vermilion Cultural Center replica of an early day school room. If heard speaking French, students were required to write the sentence shown on the blackboard.
Laissez les bon temps - (Let The Good Times Roll)
Laissez les bon temps – (Let The Good Times Roll)