“The Dragonfly” – A Balance in Nature

“The Dragonfly” – A Balance in Nature

We have all learned about the balance in nature in school and its importance to the environment and our survival. These photographs, that I was lucky enough to capture, depict just one small example of such balance in the Insecta (Insect) class of invertebrates within the arthropod phylum, in other words, the bug world. Since I possess very limited entomological knowledge and skills, I can only identify these two insects as a dragonfly and a wasp. I have, however, done a little research on the dragonfly and discovered some interesting facts and myths you might find interesting.

Experts believe there are somewhere between 5500 and 6500 species of dragonflies and damselflies total. The damselfly is different from the dragonfly in that it is usually slim and its eyes are widely separated with its wings narrow at the base. Most species hold their wings above the abdomen. The dragonfly is larger and its eyes touch near the top of its head. When resting, its wings are usually spread.

The life span of a dragonfly ranges from less than a month to six months in temperate zones. They eat other flying insects particularly mosquitoes. Dragonflies are known for their ability to hover in one spot for a long period of time and for their ability to dart from place to place. A dragonfly can go from a dead stop to 90 mph in a few seconds.

Dragonflies have been in existence for over 100 million years. They are an amazing creature which often gives birth to interesting mythology.

In Ireland and parts of Europe, dragonflies were associated with fairies. Some fables and fairytales told that if you would follow a dragonfly, it would lead you to fairies. In Sweden,

Folklore tells that dragonflies come around to check for bad souls and are believed to sneak up on children who tell lies and also on adults who curse and scold.  Dragonflies had a variety of roles in Native American tribes. The Hopi and Pueblo tribes considered the dragonfly a medicine animal associated with healing and transformation. Killing a dragonfly was considered taboo. To the Japanese, it symbolizes summer and autumn. In China, people associate it with prosperity, harmony and as a good luck charm. In many regions the dragonfly is considered to be an agent of change and symbolic of a sense of self-realization.

Dragonfly and Wasp
Dragonfly and Wasp

 

 

 

Dragonfly and Wasp
Dragonfly and Wasp

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Pass In Review”

“Pass In Review”

“Pass in Review” is just one of the numerous commands used by the military. Parade Rest, Eyes Right or Left, Hup 1,2,3,4 are some other terms or phrases.

I have chosen some of my wildlife photographs that I, with a little imagination, think some of these commands might apply.  This Blog is in no form or fashion intended to degrade any military procedure, ritual, or meaning.

"Hup,1,2,3,4"
“Hup,1,2,3,4”
"Eyes Right""
“Eyes Right””
"Pass In Review"
“Pass In Review”
A Fly Over
A Fly Over
"Parade Rest"
“Parade Rest”
"Hup,1,2,3,4"
“Hup,1,2,3,4”
"Pass In Review"
“Pass In Review”
"Double Time"
“Double Time”
"Eyes Left"
“Eyes Left”
A Single Fly Over
A Single Fly Over
"Periscope Up"
“Periscope Up”
"Dive,Dive,Dive!"
“Dive,Dive,Dive!”
"Pass In Review"
“Pass In Review”

 

A Buck Moon over Big “D”

A Buck Moon over Big “D”

Native Americans had names and meanings for each full moon of the year. The July full moon is named Buck Moon because this is the month that buck deer begin growing new antlers. The July full moon is also called the Thunder Moon because thunderstorms are fairly frequent during this time of year. July is also a month of hay harvesting, thus the full moon is often called the Hay Moon.

These Buck Moon photographs were taken while standing on the Trinity River Pedestrian Bridge in Dallas, TX on July 1, 2015 between the hours of 8:30 and 9:00 pm.

The Farmer’s Almanac indicates there will be a second full moon on July 31, 2015. This full moon is called a Blue Moon because there are two full moons in the same month – Once in a Blue Moon.

Buck Moon
Buck Moon
Buck Moon Over Big "D"
Buck Moon Over Big “D”
Buck Moon and Reunion Tower
Buck Moon and Reunion Tower
Reunion Tower and Buck Moon Above
Reunion Tower and Buck Moon Above
Buck Moon
Buck Moon

 

 

 

Independence Hall and the Declaration of Independence

Independence Hall and the Declaration of Independence
We hold these truths to be self evident…

Independence Hall is famous as the place where two of the most important documents of the United States were debated, drafted, approved and signed – The Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776 and the United States Constitution, September 17, 1787.

The Pennsylvania State House later became known as Independence Hall and a symbol of a nation to come. In the spring of 1729 the citizens of Philadelphia petitioned to build a state house and committed two thousand pounds to the project. Thomas Lawrence, Dr. John Kearsley, and Andrew Hamilton were commissioned to select a site, acquire plans for the building, and a company for the construction. The State House was paid for by the Pennsylvania colonial legislature as funds were available, meaning it was finished piecemeal between 1732 and 1753. The State House was designed by Edmund Woolley and Andrew Hamilton and built by Woolley. However, there had been much disagreement between Dr. John Kearsley and Andrew Hamilton on several issues that necessitated arbitration. August 14, 1732 the House of Representatives ruled in favor of Hamilton. Ground was broken soon after and 21 years later the building was completed. Through the years many changes, additions and alterations have taken place. The Liberty Bell is presently located across the street from Independence Hall. The Thomas Stretch Clock has been restored to name a few.

The Pennsylvania State House served as the principal meeting place for the Second Continental Congress. It was in the Assembly Room that George Washington was nominated as commander -in – chief of the Continental Army. It is also where Benjamin Franklin was appointed the first Postmaster General of what would later become the United States Post Office Department. At one time the basement served as the city’s dog pound and the second floor was once home to Charles Wilson Peale’s museum of natural history.

George Washington’s “rising sun” chair dominates the Assembly Room. Unfortunately, when I photographed that part of the Assembly Room, I could not get a close up shot of a sun carved on the back of the chair.  James Madison reported Benjamin Franklin saying, “I have often looked at that behind the president and without being able to tell whether it was rising or setting. But now I…know that it is a rising sun.” I suggest you Google George Washington’s “rising sun” chair

I hope these photographs will take you back to colonial times and stir your patriotic feelings, maybe even raise a goose bump or two, especially on Independence Day.

Independence Hall
Independence Hall
Independence Hall
Independence Hall
Rear of Independence Hall
Rear of Independence Hall
Thomas Stretch Clock on the Left
Thomas Stretch Clock on the Left
Assembly Room - Independence Hall
Assembly Room – Independence Hall
Assembly Room - Independence Hall
Assembly Room – Independence Hall
"Rising Sun" chair where George Washington sat as he presided over the Second Continental Congress
“Rising Sun” chair where George Washington sat as he presided over the Second Continental Congress
George Washington
George Washington
We hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal...
We hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal…
Liberty Bell
Liberty Bell
The U.S. Capitol and Washington Monument
The U.S. Capitol and Washington Monument
The Capitol Building of our Nation
The Capitol Building of our Nation
Stars and Stripes Forever! HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY!!!!!!
Stars and Stripes Forever!
HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY!!!!!!