Birds of the Rio Grande Valley Part 2

Birds of the Rio Grande Valley – Part 2

This week’s Blog is Part 2 of Birds of the Rio Grande Valley.

I have taken the liberty to include some information you might find interesting and thought provoking.

If you will look closely at the tree trunk the Yellow-bellied Woodpecker is clinging to, you will see a series of small holes. These were made by the woodpecker to attract insects for a food source. Sap seeps into the holes which attracts insects. I like to think of this as “Woody’s Cafeteria”.

According to the American Bird Conservancy hundreds of millions of birds die each year in collisions with man made structures, including glass windows and buildings, communication towers, and wind turbines. Surprisingly the largest contributor to bird mortality is free-roaming domestic cats. These cats kill an estimated 1.4-3.7 billion birds yearly. To gain a perspective of the enormity, consider that 1.4 billion is equivalent to the entire human population of China. The following yearly data gives you an idea of the bird mortality rate when birds collide with manmade structures:2013 Wind turbines 573,000; 2012 Towers 6.8 million; 2005 Power lines 175 million; 2014 Glass 300 million -1 billion.

The effect of free-roaming domestic cats on the bird population has become a Hot Button issue between cat lovers and the protectors of the birds.

 

1 Great Kiskadee
1 Great Kiskadee
2 Black Phoebe
2 Black Phoebe
3 Chachalacas
3 Chachalacas
4 Northern Cardinal - female
4 Northern Cardinal – female
5 Red-winged Blackbirds
5 Red-winged Blackbirds
6 Hooded Oriole
6 Altamira Oriole
7 Northern Cardinal - male
7 Northern Cardinal – male
8 Green Jay
8 Green Jay
9 Chachalaca
9 Chachalaca
10 Ring-necked Duck
10 Ring-necked Duck
11 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
11 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
12 Altamira Oriole
12 Hooded Oriole

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Birds of the Rio Grande Valley – Part 1

Birds of the Rio Grande Valley – Part 1

This photographer spent the week-end in the Rio Grande Valley with his Valentine photographing birds of the area. These photographs were shot in the following World Birding Center locations: Bentsen-Rio Grande Valley State Park (Mission), Old Hidalgo Pumphouse (Hidalgo), Estero Llano Grande State Park (Weslaco), Quinta Mazatlan (McAllen).

Having the opportunity to photograph a variety of many different birds, I am presenting Birds of the Rio Grande Valley in two separate blogs. Part 1 is this week and Part 2 follows the next week. I hope you enjoy the photos and are challenged to investigate some of the birds in more detail.

1 Clay-colored Thrush
1 Clay-colored Thrush
3 Northern Cardinal- Female
3 Northern Cardinal- Female
5 Green Jay
5 Green Jay
7 Golden-fronted Woodpecker
7 Golden-fronted Woodpecker
8 Chachalaca
8 Chachalaca
10 Great Kiskadee
10 Great Kiskadee
11 Painted Bunting - Female
11 Painted Bunting – Female
12 Green Jays & Red-winged Blackbird
12 Green Jays & Red-winged Blackbird
13 Hooded Oriole
13 Hooded Oriole
14 Altamira Oriole
14 Altamira Oriole